Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Life of Copperband Butterfly Fish

Life of Sea | Copperband Butterfly Fish (Chelmon rostratus) | Copperband Butterflyfish are also known as the Beaked Butterflyfish, Beaked Coralfish, or Orange Stripe Butterfly. This Butterflyfish is one of the three species in the genus Chelmon, all known for having long beaks. People want them in the aquarium. They are usually found on coral reefs or rocky shores and in estuaries and silty inner reefs. This species is territorial and oviparous. They live at a depth of 1-25 meter alone or in pairs. In the wild, they are found in the western Pacific and Indian Ocean Northeastern: Andaman Sea to Ryukyu Islands and Australia, Southeast Asia to the Great Barrier Reef, Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands.

 
Scientific classification
Kingdom:     Animalia
Phylum:     Chordata
Class:     Actinopterygii
Order:     Perciformes
Family:     Chaetodontidae
Genus:     Chelmon
Species:     C. rostratus


Physically, the
Copperband Butterflyfish is a beautiful white with copper bands running vertically on the sides of the body. These fish have a long, narrow nose and mouth used for hunting into crevices and holes for food. The Copperband Butterflyfish is yellow-orange vertical bands with a black border. Juveniles are similar to adults. They have a "false eye" on the back of the dorsal fin. They can grow to about 8 inches (20 cm). The young are very similar, but the ocellus on the dorsal fin is larger, and orange bars are more strikingly edged with black. 

 
Copperband Butterflyfish is very similar in appearance to its close relative the  Margined Butterflyfish. As adults, these two species can be distinguished by their color pattern, but as youngsters they are almost identical. As Margined butterflyfish matures, the narrow middle of the body disappears and the bar is dark ocellus. The natural diet of Copperband Butterflyfish consist mainly of worms, mussels, tunicates and crustaceans. As a pet, please give the fish a variety of meaty foods, dried flakes, prepared frozen foods, vegetables and tablets. 

Copperband Butterflyfish are semi-aggressive fish. They are not overly aggressive, but are very territorial and will become aggressive towards other members of their own kind, and sometimes other butterfly fish in the same genus, Chelmon. They are best kept in peaceful community tanks. It is recommended that one copy per aquarium and stress-inducing fish should be avoided. Among the inmates are the perfect not-so-aggressive angelfish Centropyge as members, Apolemichthys, Genicanthus, and Chaetodontoplus Pygoplites. It is also suited to smaller and non-aggressive fish like cardinalfish fish, gobies, dragonets, tilefish, and sometimes other types of butterflyfish, fairy bass lets, fairy wrasses and flasher. Seeing the dart into hiding is a good indication that the sense of threat and the situation may be remedied with one of the fish are removed. 

 
The Copperband Butterflyfish gets its name from the copper bands over the sides of his white body. This species tends to be peaceful with all other aquarium fish, rarely showing any type of aggression. You must remember that Copperband Butterflyfish is a difficult fish to feed. It is a shy and deliberate feeder that a variety of food offered to it may be necessary to begin to feed. 

In its natural habitat, are expected to heavily feed tube worms and small crustaceans. In captivity, some soon accept fresh and frozen foods and easy to maintain. Others will refuse to eat initially, but may be tempted to live foods offered in a way that simulates their natural environment to nourish food. Offer a variety of meaty foods, dried flakes, prepared frozen foods, and tablets. Vegetables like lettuce or Japanese Nori (Asakusa-nori) can also be promoted. Offer various food quite often at first. Feeding at least twice a day. If it's a little juvenile, must eat often in small quantities, three or four times every day. Once properly acclimatized it can be quite a hardy fish, but for how long is unknown. 

 
Keeping Copperband Butterflyfish varies among individuals. Some will soon accept fresh and frozen foods and easy to maintain. Others will refuse to eat initially, but may be tempted to live foods offered in a way that simulates their natural environment to nourish food. And yet, other people will refuse food completely and eventually perish. Young people tend to accept different foods and can often adapted to aquarium life than adults. Many of the Chaetodon members are often very colorful and attractive to aquarists. Unfortunately, some of them are quite hard to keep for a long period. Some are exclusively coral eaters, and sometimes they suffer from "ich" (white spot disease) and other infectious diseases.They can be successfully treated with medical care or copper drugs, but some species hate sudden changes of water, including pH, temperature or any drug treatment.

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